Kracker Dan | Digging up the Old Tunes

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Folk: Minstrel Folk: Traditional Folk Moods: Type: Acoustic
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Digging up the Old Tunes

by Kracker Dan

Good old fashioned ear candy laced with awesomeness and grounded in history and tradition. Warning: Contains Banjos.
Genre: Folk: Minstrel
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Digging Up the Old Tunes
0:49 $0.99
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2. Keemo Kimo
2:00 $0.99
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3. Old Joe Clark
3:01 $0.99
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4. The Glendy Burk
2:42 $0.99
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5. Ring, Ring the Banjo
2:35 $0.99
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6. The Blackest Crow
3:58 $0.99
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7. Oh! Lud Gals
2:40 $0.99
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8. Angeline the Baker (Live)
4:05 $0.99
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9. Tarbaby's Revenge
1:57 $0.99
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10. Jenny Get Your Hoe Cake Done
2:31 $0.99
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11. Old King Crow
3:16 $0.99
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12. Old Folks At Home
3:41 $0.99
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13. Grape Vine Twist
1:43 $0.99
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14. Soldier's Joy
2:14 $0.99
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15. Cold Frosty Morning
2:18 $0.99
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16. Lorena
3:47 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Here at Kracker Dan, we play music that makes us happy. We hope that makes you happy too. Digging Up the Old Tunes is a compilation of early American music with our own flavor added to the mix. Most of the songs would have made the Top 40 charts in the 1800's ... if anyone had bothered inventing such a thing ... and its our mission to reintroduce this music to the world. The one exception to the historic nature of the album is "Tarbaby's Revenge", which is an original composition by The Banjo King, Kracker Dan's own Daniel Wainwright. Enjoy!
Here at Kracker Dan, we play music that makes us happy. We hope that makes you happy too. Digging Up the Old Tunes is a compilation of early American music with our own flavor added to the mix. Most of the songs would have made the Top 40 charts in the 1800's ... if anyone had bothered inventing such a thing back then ... and its our mission to reintroduce this music to the world. The one exception to the historic nature of the album is "Tarbaby's Revenge", which is an original composition by The Banjo King, Kracker Dan's own Daniel Wainwright. Enjoy!

Track 1: Diggin' Up the Old Tunes -- We just thought it was funny to make the boys dig holes in the yard looking for banjos.

Track 2: Keemo Kimo -- Originally published 1854 for Christy and Woods, a celebrated banjo melody. Be sure to learn the chorus, there will be a test later.

Track 3: Old Joe Clark -- Traditional folk tune with no known composer or date. Heck, no one can even agree who Joe is! We like him though. We've found about 90 different stanzas for this one, we didn't use 'em all, though. Keeping with tradition, Kaptain Steve did add his own verse there at the end.

Track 4: The Glendy Burke -- This is a Stephen Foster tune published in 1860 about a side-wheel packet steamer that ran the Mississippi and Ohio rivers in the 1850's. The boat was named for Glen D. Burke who was a wealthy merchant, banker, and mayor of New Orleans. There's a catchy little chorus you'll find yourself humming the rest of the day.

Track 5: Ring, Ring the Banjo -- Another Foster tune, this time from 1851. A tune celebrating that melodious instrument, the banjo.

Track 6: The Blackest Crow -- A little change on the vocals here, Daniel is on lead and Kaptain Steve is singing harmony. A 19th century Appalachian tune about eternal love and loss.

Track 7: Oh! Lud Gals -- A song about Kaptain's favorite things: women, drinking and tobacco. Written by Dan Emmett in 1843 and included in the 1855 Briggs Banjo Instructor.

Track 8: Angelina Baker/Angeline the Baker - A demonstration of the evolution of music. The first part of our version is the 1850 version that Stephen Foster wrote for Christy's Minstrels. The second half shows how the tune has earned its place as a modern bluegrass staple.

Track 9: Tarbaby's Revenge -- Not Brer Rabbit's Tarbaby, nope. Tarbaby is the name of Daniel's fret-less 4-string minstrel banjo and he makes use of it on this track. This is an original composition by our own Daniel Wainwright.

Track 10: Jenny Get Your Hoecake Done -- The Celebrated Banjo Song, as sung with great Applause at the Broadway Circus, by Joel Walker Sweeney in 1840. What is a hoecake? Glad you asked. Tasty. That's what it is. So good it'll make a tadpole slap a whale down.

Track 11: Old King Crow -- Another vocal rearrangement, Uncle Pa takes over the reigns here, while Danny gets stuck in the role of Jenny. (I think he secretly likes it.) An A.F. Winnemore song made popular by the Virginia Minstrels in 1847. This is my 3 year old's favorite song, ever. We have to listen to it every time we get in the truck. Every. Single. Time.

Track 12: Old Folks at Home -- Also known a "Swanee River", this was written by Stephen Foster in 1850 for E.P. Christy.

Track 13: Grape Vine Twist -- By Joel Sweeney, 1846. Catchy little ditty with a key change in the middle.

Track 14: Soldier's Joy -- The Library of Congress declared Soldier's Joy to be one of the oldest and most widely distributed old time fiddle tunes. Some claim this song has American origins, but it can be traced to the mid 1700's in Scotland and Ireland. Kaptian Steve and Daniel shattered several really nice glasses during this recording, not that I'm holding a grudge or anything.

Track 15: Cold Frosty Morning -- Here's a little something different. This is a Scottish tune that commemorates a the 1746 battle of Culloden Moor. The short version of the story goes like this: the Scotts were rebelling, the English didn't like it, so the British army massacred every Highlander they could find -- even the ones not involved in the rebellion. Our rendition has less blood and viscera than the original.

Track 16: Lorena -- Recorded in its entirety by Kaptain Steve during the children's nap time on a Saturday afternoon. Written in 1856 by Henry Webster after a broken engagement this song. A lament about the beauty of life that might have been.

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Reviews


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David Morgan

Digging up the Old Tunes
Fantastic, lively, puts you right there in the show. As good as I've heard at live performances.
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