Elfamail | Dead Hookers

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Dead Hookers

by Elfamail

Sweet Doggy. Marginally successful battle rapper Elfamail has a new CD. Featuring production mastermind Earmint and ace D.J. Once a Month. Featuring tracks about eating homeless people, internet dating, contracting an STD, and having your period.
Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap: Rap
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. we like to make you feel happy
1:09 $0.99
clip
2. chicago rocks
4:08 $0.99
clip
3. broker than durt
3:07 $0.99
clip
4. one of these days...
2:52 $0.99
clip
5. six-up
3:06 $0.99
clip
6. .
2:49 $0.99
clip
7. E-A-the R- the M- the I- the N- the T
2:18 $0.99
clip
8. whale noises and ray guns
2:48 $0.99
clip
9. bird catcher
2:27 $0.99
clip
10. the heat on the street
2:00 $0.99
clip
11. Ha-Do-Ken!
2:37 $0.99
clip
12. this bar sucks
2:17 $0.99
clip
13. fags
2:36 $0.99
clip
14. Da Da da da da da da da da da da da da
2:33 $0.99
clip
15. social reform
2:51 $0.99
clip
16. suburban cowboy
3:09 $0.99
clip
17. internet dating
3:00 $0.99
clip
18. that song about eating hobos
2:48 $0.99
clip
19. stab jack in the head
1:32 $0.99
clip
20. secret hot ninja chick army
3:21 $0.99
clip
21. grime
1:28 $0.99
clip
22. the jesus of the future
2:07 $0.99
clip
23. T-Shirt from the zoo
2:42 $0.99
clip
24. you're so bad!
4:02 $0.99
clip
25. I'm awesome at guitar
1:53 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
I didn't know what to think about this album when i first saw the title. It made me chuckle a little considering that dudes name is Elfamail, and his album title is dead hookers. I been familiar with Earmints production for some time and saw Elfamail battle a couple of times at Scribble Jam. The album is solid throughout. Nothing mind blowing, but nice beats and Elfamail comes correct with his quick delivery and funny ass lines. This is a little known MC out of Chicago, but is beginning to make hisself known around the Chicago scene. DON'T SLEEP! *wink*

Posted by deap anal penetration at 5:39 AM

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Reviews


to write a review

John Book, Music For America

For the adventurers, this is a journey worth taking
Do you want crazy, a bit of the insane, a slice of the "off the rocker"? What I mean israp music that takes a few liberties to show that in a music that was once truly about freedom (or at least the freedom to be musically and lyrically free), this is the kind of album done by an MC who is looking at the state of hip-hop today from the outside, figuratively and lyrically. What he sees is a self-controlled prison, and where he's at is a place where there are so many different varieties of greatness to choose from. He represent Chicago, and he goes by the moniker of Elfamail. He album: Dead Hookers (Lab-Oratory.)

I can imagine what some of you may be saying: "what the hell, telling me you've found some good album and yet the album is called Dead Hookers. That's not right." Yes, but with hip-hop it often leads to someone's one-liner, creating a scenario where a song or album can be expressed by a few words. The title for Dead Hookers may be considered offensive, but if you're willing to shut down an album because of its title, or to condemn a group for their complexion. Eh, you don't care about that shit, you just want to know what this album is about, and who in the hell this Elfamail guy is, right? Fair enough.

Elfamail hails out of Chicago, and has done his shares of battles in the last few years with some of Chi-town's best. Anyone who has ever heard him knows that he is an admirer and a contributor to hip-hop wordplay, but those who put doubt in a battle rapper trying to record straightforward songs in the studio will have to hear what Elfamail is about. When you look at the back of the CD and see tracks with titles such as "Chicago Rocks!", "Broker Than Durt", ""Whale Noises And Ray Guns", "This Bar Sucks", and "That Song About Eating Hobos", one might think he's on the MC Paul Barman tip. A small part of Elfamail's songs is knowing where the boundaries are, and then cutting open the fence to find out what it's like outside. "The Heat On A Street" has him talking about waking up to take a piss, and eventually leading to a story about how to fuck 'em in the mouth and let the sperm burn her to death, only to jump immediately into the next song and talk about having special video game techniques, kung fu style. A few minutes later, he dreams about being in a world where everyone is gay, and comes up with a summary of tolerance. Within that summary, he hits on the stereotypes and hatred that some have over gays, and some might take the hateful lyrics as being a statement from him. Instead, he's saying that those who are quick to condemn will be the ones attacked in a stereotypical way. A few songs later, he turns himself into a "Suburban Cowboy" where the warriors of the wasteland can be found at the mall, tittie bars, and in pickup trucks. A song or two later, he is turning humans into tasty appetizers in "That Song About Eating Hobos".

"WHAT?" I hear you asking? Exactly. The approach is very scatterbrain, as if this guy tore out some pages out of a Composition book, laid them on the studio floor, did windmills for two minutes straight, felt dizzy for five, and said "okay, I'm ready to do some music". Perhaps that description is accurate, but the truth is Elfamail knows exactly what he's doing, and the fast pace of the songs (25 on the CD) and lyrics is not unlike turning on the TV and finding nothing on for a solid hour. This isn't to say Elfamail has nothing to say. Instead, the moment the listener gets into one of his twisted, hilarious, or (occasionally) serious themes, he's off to his next adventure committing more wordy crimes and rhymes. A good part of what makes these songs work is the person who is able to keep up with him musically, and that would be producer Earmint. It's not just the common breakbeats or RAER basslines, but you have a wide range of dollar bin records and vinyl trash that Earmint takes out, places on the turntable, and says "this will fit perfectly". All of these obscure sounds, and the way he chops, slices, and mixes them together, is the correct ingredients for Elfamail's stew, and anyone who listens will want to come back for seconds and thirds.

It isn't "traditional hip-hop", but again, this isn't about traditional. Well, maybe it is, it takes the core of the music and honors it respectfully, but they add their own outlook on things and warp it to the point where it sounds very unconventional. This makes it stand out from everyone else who tries to be weird for the sake of being weird, quirky because they're dorky, or whatever you want to call it. It takes the idea of "let's fuck shit up" to a new place, and the neighbors aren't quite happy with what just arrived into town. When it is consumed in one sitting, one will find Dead Hookers to be an elaborate piece of work. For the adventurers who need to be on a mission with each and every album, this is a journey worth taking.
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The Run-Off Grove

Gnarly!
Aloha, and welcome to the 155th edition of The Run-Off Groove, starring your scrib lim, John Book.

Do you want crazy, a bit of the insane, a slice of the "off the rocker"? What I mean israp music that takes a few liberties to show that in a music that was once truly about freedom (or at least the freedom to be musically and lyrically free), this is the kind of album done by an MC who is looking at the state of hip-hop today from the outside, figuratively and lyrically. What he sees is a self-controlled prison, and where he's at is a place where there are so many different varieties of greatness to choose from. He represent Chicago, and he goes by the moniker of Elfamail. He album: Dead Hookers (Lab-Oratory.)

I can imagine what some of you may be saying: "what the hell, telling me you've found some good album and yet the album is called Dead Hookers. That's not right." Yes, but with hip-hop it often leads to someone's one-liner, creating a scenario where a song or album can be expressed by a few words. The title for Dead Hookers may be considered offensive, but if you're willing to shut down an album because of its title, or to condemn a group for their complexion. Eh, you don't care about that shit, you just want to know what this album is about, and who in the hell this Elfamail guy is, right? Fair enough.

Elfamail hails out of Chicago, and has done his shares of battles in the last few years with some of Chi-town's best. Anyone who has ever heard him knows that he is an admirer and a contributor to hip-hop wordplay, but those who put doubt in a battle rapper trying to record straightforward songs in the studio will have to hear what Elfamail is about. When you look at the back of the CD and see tracks with titles such as "Chicago Rocks!", "Broker Than Durt", ""Whale Noises And Ray Guns", "This Bar Sucks", and "That Song About Eating Hobos", one might think he's on the MC Paul Barman tip. A small part of Elfamail's songs is knowing where the boundaries are, and then cutting open the fence to find out what it's like outside. "The Heat On A Street" has him talking about waking up to take a piss, and eventually leading to a story about how to fuck 'em in the mouth and let the sperm burn her to death, only to jump immediately into the next song and talk about having special video game techniques, kung fu style. A few minutes later, he dreams about being in a world where everyone is gay, and comes up with a summary of tolerance. Within that summary, he hits on the stereotypes and hatred that some have over gays, and some might take the hateful lyrics as being a statement from him. Instead, he's saying that those who are quick to condemn will be the ones attacked in a stereotypical way. A few songs later, he turns himself into a "Suburban Cowboy" where the warriors of the wasteland can be found at the mall, tittie bars, and in pickup trucks. A song or two later, he is turning humans into tasty appetizers in "That Song About Eating Hobos".

"WHAT?" I hear you asking? Exactly. The approach is very scatterbrain, as if this guy tore out some pages out of a Composition book, laid them on the studio floor, did windmills for two minutes straight, felt dizzy for five, and said "okay, I'm ready to do some music". Perhaps that description is accurate, but the truth is Elfamail knows exactly what he's doing, and the fast pace of the songs (25 on the CD) and lyrics is not unlike turning on the TV and finding nothing on for a solid hour. This isn't to say Elfamail has nothing to say. Instead, the moment the listener gets into one of his twisted, hilarious, or (occasionally) serious themes, he's off to his next adventure committing more wordy crimes and rhymes. A good part of what makes these songs work is the person who is able to keep up with him musically, and that would be producer Earmint. It's not just the common breakbeats or RAER basslines, but you have a wide range of dollar bin records and vinyl trash that Earmint takes out, places on the turntable, and says "this will fit perfectly". All of these obscure sounds, and the way he chops, slices, and mixes them together, is the correct ingredients for Elfamail's stew, and anyone who listens will want to come back for seconds and thirds.

It isn't "traditional hip-hop", but again, this isn't about traditional. Well, maybe it is, it takes the core of the music and honors it respectfully, but they add their own outlook on things and warp it to the point where it sounds very unconventional. This makes it stand out from everyone else who tries to be weird for the sake of being weird, quirky because they're dorky, or whatever you want to call it. It takes the idea of "let's fuck shit up" to a new place, and the neighbors aren't quite happy with what just arrived into town. When it is consumed in one sitting, one will find Dead Hookers to be an elaborate piece of work. For the adventurers who need to be on a mission with each and every album, this is a journey worth taking.

(Dead Hookers is available through CDBaby. If you would like to see what Elfamail is capable of during a battle, click to this video courtesy of YouTube.)
Read more...