Order 3 or more physical items and get 1¢ postal shipping
Duke Ellington | Solo Piano Concert 1964

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Earl Hines Randy Weston Thelonious Monk

More Artists From
United States - NY - New York City

Other Genres You Will Love
Jazz: Swing/Big Band Jazz: Piano Jazz Moods: Featuring Piano
There are no items in your wishlist.

Solo Piano Concert 1964

by Duke Ellington

Duke Ellington was of course known as a bandleader and one of the greatest of all American composers, but as a pianist, he was equally as great and influential, yet often overlooked.
Genre: Jazz: Swing/Big Band
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Melancholia / Reflections in D (Live)
4:03 $0.99
clip
2. Little African Flower (Live)
3:36 $0.99
clip
3. Bird of Paradise (Live)
4:28 $0.99
clip
4. Single Petal of Rose (Live)
3:21 $0.99
clip
5. New World a-Comin' (Live)
9:00 $0.99
clip
6. Take the a Train (Live)
3:50 $0.99
clip
7. Satin Doll (Live)
4:06 $0.99
clip
8. Skillipoop (Live)
7:11 $0.99
clip
9. Some of Then Hits Some of Them Standards (Live)
10:29 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Duke Ellington was of course known as a bandleader and one of the greatest of all American composers, but as a pianist, he was equally as great and influential, yet often overlooked. Here for the first time on CD and digital release, we present Ellington at his refined best, in the mid 1960s. This recording was made at Columbia University in New York City, and for the most part it’s pure solo piano by Duke, with some backing by his drummer Sam Woodyard and his bassist Ernie Shepard. He gives us several of his jewels, such as Fleurette Africaine (Little African Flower), Melancholia, as well as a previously unrecorded solo version Bird of Paradise, which dates back to 1935. Skillipoop from the “Timon of Athens” Suite, features the creativity of Woodyard. Of course as usual, there is the standard medley of Ellington “hits” where he is joined by Shepard, and Woodyard. This 1964 Solo Piano concert reaffirms what a wonderful experience it is to hear “The Piano Player” live, doing his thing.

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review