Cameron Mizell, Charlie Rauh & Ess See | A Thousand Faces

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A Thousand Faces

by Cameron Mizell, Charlie Rauh & Ess See

A gorgeous blend of Americana, stylistically drawing on the folk and jazz influences of guitarist Charlie Rauh and Cameron Mizell, featuring the Ess See’s earthy, folkloric tale delivered at times with lilting earnestness as well as soaring conviction.
Genre: Folk: Folk-Jazz
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  Song Share Time Download
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1. A Thousand Faces
Cameron Mizell, Charlie Rauh & Ess See
3:06 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
“A Thousand Faces,” the first collaborative release from guitarists Charlie Rauh, Cameron Mizell, and artist/producer Ess See, is a gorgeous blend of Americana, stylistically drawing on the folk and jazz influences of both guitarists. Rauh’s harmonically rich acoustic guitar tone and Mizell’s eloquent and precise electric guitar weave a landscape of understated melodic exchange and spacious warmth - setting the scene for Ess See’s earthy, folkloric tale delivered at times with lilting earnestness as well as soaring conviction.

The lead single anticipates a duo record Rauh and Mizell recorded for Destiny Records in Austin, TX with engineer George Shalda, who is responsible for the impeccable sound of the Destiny catalog. What We Have In Common features four originals each by Rauh and Mizell, and their first co-write in “A Thousand Faces.” As their first studio-recorded encounter suggests, both guitarists share a deep adoration for early-American folk music through a steady flow of conversational interplay. In the tune’s brief improvisational exchanges, the individual nuances of the guitarists are brought to the forefront through Rauh’s gentle Appalachian leanings and Mizell’s soulful western coloring.

“Writing together came naturally for us,” Mizell explains, “We’ve played together so much—and enjoy each other’s music—that it’s very easy to compose a dialogue from one phrase to the next.” Rauh relates that “The song is meant to feel like part of a history, a recollection. My hope is that when people hear it, they feel it is both familiar and uncharted.”

It was a natural next step to invite their long-time friend and fellow Brooklyn-based songwriter Ess See to pen lyrics and bring her singular vocal style to the table. “I found myself crafting lyrics in more of a storytelling structure than I’m typically used,” describes the singer of her end of the collaboration. Mizell chose the title for the song as a nod to Joseph Campbell’s writings on the hero’s journey, which in turn became the basis for Ess See’s lyric. “I spent time mulling over Campbell’s ideas and figuring out how to meld them with what was going on in my heart, which at the time was in shambles after a breakup. I actually think this was an eerie coincidence and learning about Campbell’s concepts gave me a new language to talk about the pain I was experiencing in my own journey.”

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